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will face a very difficult journey. stephanie. >> thank you jennifer. al jazeera's lisa stark is in washington with that side of the story, lisa good afternoon. what is the latest on the investigation? >> well, stephanie we are expecting some new information in a few short hours before the ntsb has released the press again. that work is continuing on the scene but also right here in washington, d.c, at the ntsb lab. they have the two data recorders from the train in the lab. the are trying to download to see what it may reveal. they want to know how fast was that train going and did the operator try oapply the brakes and if so, when. the operator has reportedly said he did try to engage the brakes and they did not work. the event recorder should tell them if that was the case. they will interview the trainer operator to find out exactly what was going on in the moments before that derailment. the ntsb is also going to be looking back at the last 4248, 72 hours before this accident. what was going on with the crew at that time? especially what was their sleep patterns? you may
, questions will be raised about what could have prevented the tragedy. lisa, good morning to you. so transportation experts have been talking about this technology that may have prevented the crash. can you tell us a little bit more about that. . >> good morning, stephanie. it's called positive train control. it's a safety system that congress has mandated for the railroads. it is supposed to be in place by the end of 2015. it is partially a computer system, but it uses gps, and senators on the train and tracks. we talked with ntsb board member earlier today about this system. >> positive train control, which is a -- a technical name for a system that prevents trains from occupying the same set of tracks. it does provide signals for the train to slow. we don't know if that would have made a difference in this accident. we'll certain be looking at that. >> this is a very complicated and expensive system to install. metro north which ran the train has already told the federal government it will not make the 2015 deadline. it wants an extra three years. so stephanie any system like this
four and injuring dozens more. the engineer was in a daze at the time. lisa stark has more on the investigation. >> the national transportation safety board wouldn't say what condition the engineer may have been in prior to the tragedy, but found no indications of mechanic call problems. the brakes on the train, that barrelled along at 80 miles per hour, the breaks were tested before the run began, and worked fine at all the stops before the accident. here is board member earl weener. >> based on this data, there's no indication that the brakes were not functioning. >> rockerfeller was on the fifth day of a nine hour shift. the ntsb said he should have had plenty of time to get sleep before starting up at 5am on a train run. another issue is positive train control or ptc. it's a system to would allow a computer system to take hold of the train to stop or slow it if the engineer fails to act in a dangerous situation. it may have made a difference here. the mta which operates the metro north line says it budgeted $600 million for positive train control, started to work on it
. >>> the national transportation board is investigating the cause of the crash. lisa stark is in washington with that side of the story. what is the latest on the investigation. >> reporter: good morning p they tell me that they plan to interview the operator of this train this afternoon. he was injured in the crash. he is in the hospital, but they plan to talk to him about what happened in moments before the train went off the rail. the operator was drug and alcohol tested. we don't know the results of those tests. also they have subpoenaed his cell phone records. this has become a standard procedure after accidents likes these. the question is was that operator texting or talking on his phone when he shouldn't have been, when he should have been driving the train. they'll take a close look at those cell phone records. the trains involved in this accident were older rail cars. thethe ntsb continues its investigation. it will be on scene for 7 to 10 days working up the final investigation many months after that. stephanie? >> okay, lisa stark with the latest on the investigation. from washi
safety board is investigating the cause of the crash. they're on the scene. lisa stark is in washington with that side of the story. good afternoon. what is the latest on the investigation? >> reporter: well, they now have the two event recorders, the data recorders back here in washington, d.c. they're in the mtsb lab, they're going through the data they can get from those recorders. one thing to look for is the speed of the train, how fast was it going. they also want to know the break pressure. were the brakes applied, when and how strenuously. i'm told the reporter will monitor the recorder every 21 seconds. the operator of this train indicated that he tried to apply the brakes, and it didn't work. i asked mtsb board members about thathat, they mentioned that ths train had nine stops before the accident, and the brakes seemed to be working fine. it will be a concern if the brakes suddenly failed. they interviewed the operator this afternoon. he was drug and alcohol tested and his cell phone records were subpoenaed, and the mtsb will be down taking a closer look at the tracks to see
. the question is why? lisa stark joins us from washington. what is the latest? >> that train should have been going at 30 miles an hour around the curve. there are no published reports this morning including from wabc, those reports indicate that the engineer, william rockefeller has said he may have zoned out at the controls. he may have dosed off and then snapped awake too late to stop the train in time the ntsb will continue to interview the engineer and also look back at the man's 72-hour history before this accident. did he get enough sleep? did fatigue play a roll in this accident. the train left his original station very, very early sunday morning. fatigue has long been a concern in transportation accidents, and that will certainly be one of the key questions here. >> and that really gets to the heart of whether this was mechanical failure on human error. thank you lisa. >>> up next a look at today's top headlines and a rundown on some nasty weather on the horizon. >>> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm stephanie sy. here are today's head loins. president obama and congressional d
that and more when "real money" continues. >> lisa fletcher with the stream joins us. >> when you think of the perfect place to put a beehive, times square could be an option. bees are dying, and some urban bee keeping is part of the solution. >> where are so many bees dying off? some people believe its linked to pesticide. but there is a lot to it, and we'll explore it with our bee experts. just use the hashtag aj stream. >> black friday extended from shopping malls to the car lots and it led u.s. automakers to their best november in years. chrysler reported sales 16% over last november. gm jumped 14% and ford climbed 7%. ford's f series pick ups managed to outsell all of that company's cars. some attribute the sales to falling gas prices and aggressive promotions. dealers are bolstering their sales staff, but not all of their new hires work the show room floor. many work behind a desk in front of computer screen using the internet to bring in buyers. woody, from naperville, illinois, woody has been selling cars for 40 years. what do you make of this trend buying cars online? how is th
>> hi, i'm lisa fletcher and you're in the treatment. fran pope francis is getting wave reviewed but is he a game changer? we break down the pop fourteen francis -- pope francis effect. >> our digital producer wajahat ali is here. keep it coming. waj, catholic or not pope francis is all the buzz now. >> i'm not catholic, but i went to an all boy's jess wit high school, bellarmine. we have oswald, says he is the hope i have been waiting for. chris on twitter thinks the pope thinks aids is bad, the dogma is old, #yan. we have a different pope and that's it. >> accusing the pope of doing branding. we're going to get into it. what is the pope francis effect? from rome to rio de janeiro, what is the buzz? however his softened language on hot button issues have some evaluating his political impact. joining us to take a closer look at the pope francis effect is father john guthrie, a member of the clergy for more than 20 years. sister jean grenick, she has been vocal on lgbt issues, a move that got her sanctioned by the church. and he penned an article, what can sarah palin and the gop
it may have been caused by human error. lisa czar joins us now. good to see you. what have you been learning today? >> well, tony, the attention now is focused on the man at the controls. he was the engineer of this early morning run. he said he zoned out right before the accident, and was jolted to attention too late to stop this speeding train. now, that makes sense based on what we know so far according to don phillips. he covered transportation for decades for the washington post, and now rights for trains mac zone. >> that is sort of rare these days for someone in railroading to speed. so it is just someone that leads to the possibility that for some reason he was not paying attention. >> the safety board said there is nothing wrong with the tract. >> have they talked about technology, right, that may have prevented -- actually prevented the crash, can you tell us about that? >> it's called positive train control, it is a very sophisticating technology. it uses computers, and gps satellite sensors on the track. a central control system. could that have helped here? we asked nts
see you again at 4am eastern. >> hi, i'm lisa fletcher, and you're in "the stream." it's a major buzz kill that impacts us all. why are so many bees dying, and what's being done to help the hives survive. so the next time you're eating, think about this. every third bite of food can be traced back to bees. the typy insects produce more than just honey. bees help to pollinate 98% of flowers and crops. they're an integral part of the ecosystem that some are warning is being lost. beekeepers are reporting mass die offs. between 25 and 40% of bees have disappeared because of colony collapse. scientists say that it's habitats, dwindling food supplies, and diseases that target bees. and a potential killer, pesticides. to protect the crops, they're killing bees. and they are starting to carry bee advisories in 2014. but some are demanding more, pointing to the european union's two year ban. in banning pesticides, it makes the situations worse, so how do we figure out what's causing bees to die off and coming up with a solution to save them? raj is here, and i got to tell you, it was qui
to come. >> lisa fletcher is away, but we have our man julio, we can talk about this all day. >> we have been talking about it. >> we're still processing it. you told
does not have a delete button here are some tweet questions as well. >> lisa, that is the stream up next right after "real money." >> beware of the next financial bubble. that's the message from robert schiller, one of three winners of this year's nobel prize for economics. the research and asset price bubbles schiller has said he's concerned about drastically rising prices in markets like brazil. he said i'm most worried about the boom in the u.s. stock market because the economy is still weak and vulnerable. schiller said he's not sounding the alarm yet but avoids financials and technology. >>> many americans do their investing exclusive italy through mutual funds and retirement plans and some of them are increasingly worried that 401s will not carry them through retirement. some are moving through funds in rand out like a trader buys and sells stocks. this is getting a thumbs up from some investors but a thumbs down from financial investors who guide money. >> she figures she'd need 4 million to have a financially secure retirement. >> top of my list, china, new zealand, africa,
on al jazeera america. [♪ music ] >> hi, i'm lisa fletcher, and you are in "the stream" . would you take a digital do over if you could? soon kids around california will be able to erase their online indiscretions. what about the rest of us? ♪ >> our digital producer wag is here to bring in your questions and comments live throughout the show. if you could hit digital delete on your digital path. >> my entire pubertiy from 1993 to now. but some how it got me this job, so no. but niles on twitter makes a great comment. he goes, nothing is sacred on the internet. we should assume that anything we post is out there for the world to see, even with privacy settings. aina said this should be available to all people. not just minors. and again 20 out of 23 kids in the class said they felt scared by social media. >> that may not be such a bad thing. it candidates there i indicatest there. it is going to be an option in 1919. the eraser law allows miners to remove content or information. other states are considering similar bills. and in the u.s. senate ed markey has reintroduced his feder
than 80 miles an hour down the track. the question is why? lisa stark joins us from washington. what is the latest? >> that train should have been going at 30 miles an hour around the curve. there are no published reports this morning including from wabc, those reports indicate that the engineer, william rockefeller has said he may have zoned out at the controls. he may have dosed off and then snapped awake too late to stop the train in time the ntsb will continue to interview the engineer and also look back at >> al jazeera america is a straight-forward news channel. >> its the most exciting thing to happen to american journalism in decades. >> we believe in digging deep. >> its unbiased, fact-based, in-depth journalism. >> you give them the facts, dispense with the fluff and get straight to the point. >> i'm on the ground every day finding stories that matter to you. >> in new orleans... >> seattle bureau... >> washington... >> detroit... >> chicago... >> nashville... >> los angeles... >> san francisco... >> al jazeera america, take a new look at news. >> every sunday night al jaze
website, any time, aljazeera.com. thanks for watching. >> hi, i'm lisa fletcher, and you're in "the stream." it's a major buzz kill that impacts us all. why are so many bees dying, and what's being done to help the hives survive. so the next time you're eating, think about this. every third bite of food can be traced back to bees. the typy insects produce more than just honey. bees help to pollinate 98% of flowers and crops. they're an integral part of the ecosystem th
by one smart phone at a time. i'm ali velshi, thanks for watching. ♪ >> hi, i'm lisa fletcher and you're in the treatment. fran pope francis is getting wave reviewed but is he a game changer? we break down the pop fourteen francis -- pope francis effect. >> our digital producer wajahat ali is here. keep it coming. waj, catholic or not pope francis is all the buzz now. >> i'm not catholic, but i went
. log on to aljazeera.com for the latest headlines. thanks for watching. >> hi, i'm lisa fletcher and you're in the treatment. fran pope francis is getting wave reviewed but is he a game changer? we break down the pop fourteen francis -- pope francis effect. >> our digital producer wajahat ali is here. keep it coming. waj, catholic or not pope francis is all the buzz now. >> i'm n c
a hearing to hear from americans who benefited from these benefits. one is lisa floyd. she shared her personal story. she worked for a hospice organization. she couldn't find a job and was unemployed, and she said unemployment insurance got her through. >> i have spent the majority of my waking hours looking for work. during this time, i was able to support myself because i received those vital unemployment insurance benefits. >> and miss floyd told the democrats that she has just gotten a job, so good news for her. democrats are using her and other americans to try to put a personal face on this issue. >> what is the republicans response? >> house speaker john boehner just addressed reporters, and he said the way to get americans back to work is to fix the economy. and we talked about obamacare. he said that he is willing to look at a plan to extend unemployment benefits if the president presents one -- if president obama shows him one, but he said the president has the focus. >> the president is more focused on inkoreaing reliance on programs than creating better jobs. republicans c
's where we are at this point. lisa, transportation experts have talked about technology that may, and we underline that, may have prevented the crash. what can you tell bus that? >> reporter: it's called positive train control, and it essentially takes over the train if the engineer fails to brake or slow down when he should. the ntsb says they have been pushing for this for decades, and they went so far as to saying it could have prevented this crash if it was on this train. it's mandated it's a few years away. >> lisa, thank you. it's political crisis that has changen thailand's capitol for a week. prime minister yingluck shinawatra ordered police to stop battling with anti-government protesters. the majority of the protesters are middle and upper class residents of bangkok who have been fighting with people from poor and rural areas who support the prime minister. now the protesters have accused the prime minister of being a proxy for her brother, former prime minister who was ousted in a coup in 2006. they accuse her government of being corrupt. we have more. >> reporter: it was expe
before the disaster. lisa stark has more on that. >> they wouldn't say what condition rockefella may have been in. there's no indication of mechanical problems. the brakes, which was barrelling at 82 miles per hour into a 30 miles per hour curve, the brakes were working fine out all the stocks. here is m.t.s.b. board member earl wiener. >> there's no indications that the break systems were not functioning properly. rocker fella was on the second day of a nine hour shift. he should have had plenty of time to get a full night's sleep before showing up on monday n morning for the 5am run. they'll look into that. another issue is positive train control, ptc, a system that rail roads are installing that would allow a computer system to take over control of the train to stop or slow it if the engineer fails to act in a dangerous situation. the m.t.s.b. has been calling for it for decades. it may have made a difference here. the m.t.s.b. who operates the line said it budgets $620 million for positive train control, but says it and others will not meet the mandated deadline of 2015 to have the sy
's lisa stark is following that part of the story. what is the first step when looking into a crash like this? >> the ntsb has organized itself into six investigative teams. it will look at the track itself, from the cars to the operator, the mechanical system, such as the breaking system 31 of the first priorities will be getting the data from those event recorders. there were two on this train, one in the locomotive and one in the cab car which was up front. those recorders will be able to tell how fast it was traveling, if it did try to apply the brakes. they want the to interview the crew. they hope to do that today or tomorrow. the operator did survive. he was injured. educated that he tried to apply the brakes, that the train was coming into the curve quickly and he tried to apply the brakes. they want to see what that operator has to say. the speed in that part of the rail should have been 30 miles an hour. the train would have needed to slow from 70-mile an hour on the straight away to that 30 miles an hour. did that happen? investigators will be back on the rails today to try to
received those vital unemployment insurance benefits. now lisa boyd told congress that she has found a job and will be getting back to work. thank you. on wall street once again, it is the fifth straight losing session for the blue chips. positive economic data out today is adding to concerns that the federal reserve will start tapering. one of those positive pieces of data is the latest roll on economic growth. the economy expanded much more than expected last quarter, rising at the fast e.g. pace in what a year and a half. how, nearly half a gains came from businesses simply adding to they inventories. while consumer spending actually slowed. are you kidding? another bill coin story. blank of america is giving eight thumbs up, saying it could become a popular forum of payment for ecommerce. to traditional ways of transferring money. and joining me from washington, d.c. to discuss these top business stories patriot. he is a central bank and economics reporter for the wall street journal. it is great to see you, congratulations. i am told are in order on the new gig. good to have you on th
with big-name talent like snoop dogg. >> lisa is weldon's older sister. >> he's really into music. that was his world. >> but weldon angelos was a small-time dealer of marijuana in his home town. transactions that led him down to road to this place. where he's been incars rated for almost a decade. >> weldon angelos called and talked about what led him to prison. >> i was young, dumb. i needed guidance. it was a mistake. >> a mistake he's paying dearly for, and some argue way too dearly. >> one of my childhood acquaintance was arrested facing a substantial prison sentence. he worked as an informant, arranging for the sale of marijuana. >> weldon angelos sold his friend pot recorded by the fbi. a total value of over $1,000. the informant claimed he saw a gun in two of the transactions. a search of weldon's house turned up firearms - all legally owned. the law says possession of a gun during the drug crime adds to the offence. >> lawyer jerry mooney defended weldon angelos. >> it's a progressive statute. the first gets you five years. >> to be clear, did he ever use the gun, pull th
of the derailment as they try to figure out what went wrong. lisa stark reports from washington with more on how the investigation will go. >> this is the beginning of a lengthy investigation. the mta has recovered two event recorders, kind of like black boxes on aeroplanes, and it should tell them how fast the train was going, whether the engineer applied breaks. the engineer on the train was injured but did survive. they'll be able to talk to the engineer to find out what was going on as the train came into the track. all seven cars, plus the loko motive derailed. the injuries occurred in the first cars that flipped over on the side. the mtsc will want to know what were the survivability factors. why will those who died survive. they'll look at how the train was put together to see if there's indications of safety improvements. they'll be looking at the maintenance on the rails, the signalling systems and the mta itself. the rail road had a lot of problems, including another passenger train derailment in may. luckily no one was killed. a number of people were injured in that derail: near the s
the track. the question is why? lisa stark joins us from washington. what is the latest? >> that train should have been going at 30 miles an hour around the curve. there are no published reports this morning including from wabc, those reports indicate that the engineer, william rockefeller has said he may have zoned out at the controls. he may have dosed off and then snapped awake too late to stop the train in time the ntsb will continue to interview the engineer and also look back at >> you walk into a convenience store you should expect to be recorded by aut a security came. but the fbi have revealed that people at at one market have bn preyed on for years one person was searched and jailed for six times for tresspassing on the property. >> this is the first arrest of earl sampson caught on video by his boss. it was the summer of 2012. the 28 gerald wa 28-year-old wag soda. you can see a police officer come inside and arrest sampson at the store. politthe police call it a hot s. they don't buy that sampson was an employee. he was charged with trespassing and spent that night in jail
80 miles an hour down the track. the question is why? lisa stark joins us from washington. what is the latest? >> that train should have been going at 30 miles an hour around the curve. there are no published reports this morning including from wabc, those reports indicate that the engineer, william rockefeller has said he may have zoned out at the controls. he may have dosed off and then snapped awake too late to stop the train in time the ntsb will continue to interview the engineer and also look back at >>> welcome al jazeera america. i'm ste -- stephanie sy. president obama is set to speak in a few minutes about the economy. >>> a top hezbollah leader is killed. the lebanese group says he was assassinated. ♪ >>> the u.s. economy is growing but so is the income gap between the rich and the poor. president obama will talk about how to change that and other aspects of the economy when h
was traveling far too fast, more than 80 miles an hour down the track. the question is why? lisa stark joins us from washington. what is the latest? >> that train should have been going at 30 miles an hour around the curve. there are no published reports this morning including from wabc, those reports indicate that the engineer, william rockefeller has said he may have zoned out at the controls. he may have dosed off and then snapped awake too late to stop the train in time the ntsb will continue to interview the engineer and also look back at [[voiceover]] no doubt about it, innovation changes our lives. opening doors ... opening possibilities. taking the impossible from lab ... to life. on techknow, our scientists bring you a sneak-peak of the future, and take you behind the scenes at our evolving world. techknow - ideas, invention, life. >> today's data dive gets preveny to examine the difference in gray matter between men and women. women have long claimed guys don't use their brains. turns out they may be half right. a university of pennsylvania study used brain imaging to look at brain ce
? lisa stark joins us from washington. what is the latest? >> that train should have been going at 30 miles an hour around the curve. there are no published reports this morning including from wabc, those reports indicate that the engineer, william rockefeller has said he may have zoned out at the controls. he may have dosed off and then snapped awake too late to stop the train in time the ntsb will continue to interview the engineer and also look back at >> mairps of all ages are watching less tv according to a neilsen survey, people watched three minutes less tv than a year ago. still five hours a day, whether it's live tv or dvr playback. many are watching online. citizens watched video on computers, 11 minutes a day online, more than last year. >>> well, in sports there's a significant ruling coming down for a potential heisman trophy candidate. here is sports. >> either way this kind of transpires tomorrow, the prosecutor looking into sexual assault against jameis winston, will announce his findings tomorrow afternoon. william megs said if there's a reasonable chance for convicti
far too fast, more than 80 miles an hour down the track. the question is why? lisa stark joins us from washington. what is the latest? >> that train should have been going at 30 miles an hour around the curve. there are no published reports this morning including from wabc, those reports indicate that the engineer, william rockefeller has said he may have zoned out at the controls. he may have dosed off and then snapped awake too late to stop the train in time the ntsb will continue to interview the engineer and also look back at >>> coming up on "consider this," president obama gives a talk on the economy. why is the man who helped get bin laden behind bars without much hope of getting out. the unique for animal rights, is the move to get chimpanzees personhood status going too far. >> should you think twice before going to a game? we will see you at the top of the hour. >> welcome back. here at the morseem, the work of journalists is chronicled and honored in a number you have visits including one which is a tribute to journalists who have fallen while pursuing their stories. one who
and quotes. as the world celebrates the man how will he be remembered in the years to come. >> lisa fletcher is away, but we have our man julio, we can talk about this all day. >> we have been talking about it. >> we're still processing it. you told me top three icons of a generation. >> yes, he's one of them. >> and the global community has been unprecedented. >> it set a twitter record. 93,000 tweets in a minute. >> wow. >> and so we've been getting a ton of community through hashtag, people stream. we're getting from all over the world. and it's just--it's what it is. i want to share a couple. people talking about it. here is one. when i was little girl my mom took me to see mandela in london. that moment changed my life forever. when talking about mandela's activism, he said the strength of a man is capable of changing the world. stream community keep tweeting. >> keep talking to my man julio. and madiba, prisoner 46,664. noble prize man. and he was known by many titles. had his youth he rose to prominence fighting apartheid using both none violence and violent means. >> it is useful, so
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)